Blogs

Cathy Milne's picture

by Cathy Milne APRN, MSN, BC-ANP/CS, CWOCN

Annual PAP smears as no longer considered the gold standard for women. While that may spell relief for the millions of us who dread those cold stirrups, it has far reaching consequences that may impact health care costs.

Dr. Joe Walsh, the Chief of general OB/GYN at the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington, Connecticut, recommends healthy women to have an OB/GYN exam every three years. "The question is: Is there anything we are doing beyond the Pap that will improve the woman's health? And that answer is 'no'".1 Gosh! OB/GYN health care providers are the first line of defense in detecting and preventing urinary incontinence!

Glenda Motta's picture

by Glenda Motta RN, MPH

The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) reports that nearly one in five Medicare patients discharged from a hospital—approximately 2.6 million seniors—is readmitted within 30 days, at a cost of over $26 billion every year.

Blog Category: 
Cathy Milne's picture

by Cathy Milne APRN, MSN, BC-ANP/CS, CWOCN

I'm probably going to sound like Andy Rooney, the recently deceased colorful commentator from 60 Minutes. With all due respect, I will borrow from his opening lines, "Did you ever wonder why..."

Did you ever wonder why we, as a society, never talk about fecal incontinence? Yes, that's right – poop. I had planned to discuss fiber supplements. My plans went awry when USA Today (August 18th, 2012) had a front page spread that spilled onto the Page 3 about Clostridium difficile (C-diff) infection causing more than 30,000 deaths annually in the United States. I have to talk poop.

Blog Category: 
Marilyn Lu Webb's picture

by Marilyn-Lu Webb NP-BC, PhD

Prenatal classes may not mention the possibility of several consequences, as an aftermath of the birth of beautiful new human life. Some of these are urinary leakage, fecal incontinence, vaginal prolapse and depression! Honestly, these are not what most patients might expect following a vaginal birth. However, as I asked my daughter after the birth of her first daughter, “Are you running anymore?” I knew she wanted to regain her previously svelte shape that had been possible through her tri-weekly runs with a friend. “No”, she replied. “I am leaking too much and you know there is nothing you can do about it!”

Glenda Motta's picture

by Glenda Motta RN, MPH

Anyone interested in keeping abreast of Medicare basics as well as payment policy should add the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) to your list of resources. MedPAC, an independent congressional agency, advises the U.S. Congress on issues affecting the Medicare program. The Commission’s 17 members have diverse expertise in the financing and delivery of health care services.

Cathy Milne's picture

by Cathy Milne APRN, MSN, BC-ANP/CS, CWOCN

A lovely elderly woman came into the office last week with perfectly coiffed silver hair and a sparkle in her steel blue eyes. She said to me, “Dear, I love that commercial with the copper pipes!” Thinking that I missed the latest and greatest TV event, I asked her to describe it to me. “It doesn’t really matter that it was creative. I am those copper pipes.” Aha! A psychotic patient, I thought. She zeroed in on her goal. “I want that pill that helped the copper pipes! May I have a prescription for that today, Honey?”

Glenda Motta's picture

by Glenda Motta RN, MPH

Say what you will about Obamacare, but the President has made eliminating fraud, waste, and abuse in healthcare a top priority. The Attorney General and Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary recently released a report on health care fraud prevention and enforcement efforts in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011.1 Nearly $4.1 billion was recovered, the highest ever reported. The Health Care Fraud Prevention & Enforcement Action Team (HEAT) works to prevent fraud, waste, and abuse in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Their efforts and other approaches are being expanded using tools authorized by the Affordable Care Act.

Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett MD

Because of neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, or age, most if not all of the patients seen for wound care have dry skin. This dry skin increases the risk of infection, skin tears, bruises and ulcers.

Cathy Milne's picture

by Cathy Milne APRN, MSN, BC-ANP/CS, CWOCN
Lisa Corbett APRN, MSN, BC-CS, CWOCN

It seems as if there are many idioms out there related to moisture. Most are not flattering, such as “Mad as a wet hen”. “Wet behind the ears” infers inexperience - much like a child who has not gained the neurophysiological mechanisms to gain continence.

Blog Category: 
Glenda Motta's picture

by Glenda Motta RN, MPH

Most individuals with chronic conditions would much prefer to remain at home in familiar surroundings than be relocated to a nursing care facility. Yet, the largest expenditures under state Medicaid programs involve providing institutional care for the chronic, long-term care population.