Skin Care

Glenda Motta's picture

by Glenda Motta RN, MPH

The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) reports that nearly one in five Medicare patients discharged from a hospital—approximately 2.6 million seniors—is readmitted within 30 days, at a cost of over $26 billion every year.

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Aletha Tippett MD's picture

by Aletha Tippett MD

Because of neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, or age, most if not all of the patients seen for wound care have dry skin. This dry skin increases the risk of infection, skin tears, bruises and ulcers.

Cathy Milne's picture

by Cathy Milne APRN, MSN, BC-ANP/CS, CWOCN
Lisa Corbett APRN, MSN, BC-CS, CWOCN

It seems as if there are many idioms out there related to moisture. Most are not flattering, such as “Mad as a wet hen”. “Wet behind the ears” infers inexperience - much like a child who has not gained the neurophysiological mechanisms to gain continence.

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Kathi Thimsen's picture

by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Skin protectants and moisture barrier products serve two purposes in patient care: first is to protect the skin from harmful stimuli (incontinence, wound drainage, saliva, gastric juices, etc.); second is to create a barrier between the skin and the environment. It is amazing that one product and basically one classification of ingredient can get the job done!

Kathi Thimsen's picture

by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Looking for a moisturizer? Look no further than the faucet! Did you know that water is the ONLY moisturizing ingredient? It’s true. All of the other ingredients in popular skin and wound care moisturizers are simply to keep the water where we want it to be on our patient’s skin.

When selecting a moisturizing product for a patient’s condition, check the ingredients for agents that serve as humectants. This type of ingredient attracts, holds, and binds moisture to the skin.

Kathi Thimsen's picture

by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Cleansers for skin and wound care have always been a topic of much discussion. How and why do we use skin cleansers? What are the differences between skin cleansers and soap? Can you use a skin cleanser in a wound? Why not? What should you use for wound cleansing?

Kathi Thimsen's picture

by Kathi Thimsen RN, MSN, WOCN

Why do we have the FDA

In the late 1800s the government saw the potential danger that “snake oil” salesmen posed to society. Potions and elixirs were said to calm women prone to hysteria during the pre-menstrual cycle or cure headaches. Some of the most dangerous elixirs claimed to calm colicky babies and irritable children. These potions and elixirs were formulated with water, alcohol, and in some cases, poisons like toxic herbal extracts and tar.